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Author Topic: General Training Overview - Intensity  (Read 34138 times)

Robert Frederick

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General Training Overview - Intensity
« on: April 28, 2014, 02:23:40 PM »
Relative Intensity

The relative intensity (RI) is the percentage of the average weight of the bar compared to the one repetition maximum (1RM) of an exercise. This parameter characterizes the relative degree of stress the body experiences when performing exercises regardless of body weight, skill and strength of the athlete.

Boris analyzed the training load trained of world champions (38) from 1993 to 2013 and found that the greatest increase in strength was achieved with an average relative intensity of 69.5 - 72%. However, this does not mean that all work should be done at 70% of maximum. In training sessions an athlete trains with weights in the range of 50 to 85-90%.

There are several ways to achieve an average intensity in this range. For example:

Version 1

%RM      Reps      Sets
50      5      1
60      4      1
70      3      1
80      3      2
90      2      3

Lifts = 24
Relative Intensity = 71.5%

Version 2

%RM      Reps      Sets
55      5      1
65      4      1
75      3      1
85      2      4

Lifts = 20
Relative Intensity = 72.0%

Version 3

%RM      Reps      Sets
50      5      1
60      4      1
70      3      1
80      3      5

Lifts = 27
Relative Intensity = 70.4%

Version 4

%RM      Reps      Sets
50      5      1
60      5      1
70      5      1
75      4      5

Lifts = 35
Relative Intensity = 68.6%

Version 5

%RM      Reps      Sets
50      5      1
60      4      1
70      3      1
80      3      2
85      2      3
80      3      2

Lifts = 30
Relative Intensity = 72.3%
 
When planning the load in the preparatory period for elite athletes Boris uses stressful loads once every 10 - 14 days:

Squats

Option 1: Pyramid Method
%RM      Reps            Sets
50       5            1
60      5            1
70      3,5,7,9,8,6,4*       1,1,1,1,1,1,1

*athlete does 3 reps, rests, then 5 reps, 7 and so on
   
Lifts = 52
Relative intensity = 67.1%

Option 2: Ragged Method
%RM      Reps            Sets
50      5            1
60      5            1
70      3,7,5,8,4,9,6      1,1,1,1,1,1,1

Lifts = 52
Relative intensity = 67.1%

In the first and second embodiments, both have the same number of lifts and the same relative intensity. The difference is in the ordering of the sets with 70% of 1RM.

Athletes who performed these two methods noted that the “Ragged Method" was better tolerated than the “Pyramid Method”.

Mid-level athletes perform squats using the preceding methods with a weight of 65% of 1RM.

Bench Press

Option 1: Average Pyramid
%RM      Reps      Sets
50      5      1
60      5      1
70      4      1
75      3      1
80      2      2
85      1      2
75      3      1
65      5      1
55      7      1

Lifts = 38
Relative intensity = 65.3%

Option 2: Mega Pyramid
%RM      Reps      Sets
50      7      1
60      6      1
70      5      1
75      4      1
80      3      1
85      2      2
80      3      1
75      4      1
70      5      1
65      6      1
60      7      1
55      8      1
50      9      1

Lifts  = 71
Relative intensity = 63.8%

Option 3:
%RM      Reps      Sets
50      5      1
60      4      1
70      3      1
80      3      2
85      2      3
80      2      3

 Lifts = 30
Relative intensity = 72.3%

Option 4:
%RM      Reps      Sets
50      6      1
60      5      1
70      4      1
80      3      2
85      2      2
80      3      1
75      4      1
65      5      1
55      6      1

Lifts = 43
Relative intensity = 67.3%


Option 5: Short, Intense Pyramid
%RM      Reps      Sets
50      5      1
60      4      1
70      3      1
80      3      1
85      2      2
90      1      2
85      2      2

Lifts = 25
Relative intensity = 72.0%

Intensity Zones

Maximum strength increases are achieved with loads between 91-100%. Little skeletal muscle hypertrophy occurs and strength growth is primarily the result of consolidation of the neuromuscular system. The amount of strength improvement decreases with decreasing intensity: however, the growth of muscle mass increases.

So the training of beginners should promote, first and foremost, an increase in muscle mass. This is because the weight and height data do not correspond with the weight class they are in. For example, at 173cm, a 16-17 year old beginner might weigh 75kg or less. At this height he should be in the 83-93kg weight class. This is why beginners should emphasize lower intensity zones. It will also help them reduce the risk of injury and improve learning the technique of the competitive exercises.

At a height of 173cm, the 16-17 year old beginner at 75kg has a weight-height ratio of 434g/cm (versus 520g/cm for a 90kg lifter at the same height); consequently, the muscle mass per centimeter will be less than needed. This is the reason why the lifter should switch to “his” weight class.

Optimal Heights and Weights

Height     Weight     Height     Weight     
145+/-3cm52kg168+/-2cm82.5kg
149+/-3cm56kg171+/-2cm90kg
155+/-2.5cm60kg174.5+/-2cm100kg
160+/-2cm67.5kg177.5+/-2cm110kg
164+/-2cm75kg186+/-6cm110+kg
*Target weights should be at the top of a weight class

All things being equal (the intensity of loading, the work scheme, etc.), an increase in the volume of loading contributes to an increase in a lifter’s muscle mass. Therefore the lifter’s height/weight data is an important factor for planning the loading. When it is necessary to increase muscle mass the volume of loading is at a maximum. As body weight rises to near the limit of his weight class a greater emphasis is placed on higher intensity zones.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2014, 03:36:08 PM by Robert Frederick »

tóth géza

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2014, 09:41:15 PM »
I have a question.

 The intensity is same, at squat, at dedlift and at  benchpress?

 Because at squat and dedlift you work weight and your mass, at benchpress you move only the weight.

thanks

tóth géza

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2014, 10:00:23 PM »
In the proffesional competiter what intensity zone must train?

And what changes in the intensity the reccurent method?

for  example: bench press 55% 5x1, 65 % 4x1, 75% 3x1, 85% 2x4; squat and bench press: 50% 3x1, 60% 3x1, 70% 3x1, 80% 2x4

thanks
« Last Edit: June 06, 2014, 10:19:22 PM by tóth géza »

DOMS

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2014, 12:13:41 AM »
Great read. Now what fat percent is recommended/required/optimal at these weight recommendation?

Robert Frederick

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2014, 01:17:19 PM »
Great read. Now what fat percent is recommended/required/optimal at these weight recommendation?

I think that's individualized. Whatever gives you the best total. I've seen the best results personally around 14%. I've been down to 8% but my lifts went down too. 14% also happens to be where I fall if I just eat whatever I want. That could be coincidental or maybe not.

Maurizio

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2014, 08:29:54 PM »
complete rests between the series are recomended?

DOMS

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2014, 09:01:26 PM »
Great read. Now what fat percent is recommended/required/optimal at these weight recommendation?

I think that's individualized. Whatever gives you the best total. I've seen the best results personally around 14%. I've been down to 8% but my lifts went down too. 14% also happens to be where I fall if I just eat whatever I want. That could be coincidental or maybe not.

My body gets me to 20% if i eat whatever i want. Below 15% year round would be a nice change of pace. Thanks for the reply.

Boris Sheiko

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2014, 04:59:24 PM »
I have a question.

 The intensity is same, at squat, at dedlift and at  benchpress?

 Because at squat and dedlift you work weight and your mass, at benchpress you move only the weight.

thanks

I don’t take it into account. It doesn’t influence intensity in the squat, bench press, or deadlift.

tóth géza

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2014, 08:35:10 PM »
Thank you!

patrick

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2014, 05:54:10 AM »
Is there a way to quantify the difference between, say, 3 sets of 5 reps at a given intensity vs. 5x3? 3x5 will obviously feel harder, but is there a significant difference in training effect?

Robert Frederick

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2014, 12:29:41 PM »
Is there a way to quantify the difference between, say, 3 sets of 5 reps at a given intensity vs. 5x3? 3x5 will obviously feel harder, but is there a significant difference in training effect?

3 sets of 5 reps will take longer to recover from and not just between sets but also between workouts. If you want to quantify it you could look at the lactate build up inside the muscles. You get a linear increase in lactate with each rep. But if you were to look at ammonia build up you get a curvilinear response. If you stay below half the number of a certain rep max, i.e. 3 reps at 8RM, then there is no significant increase in ammonia. That means you can come back and do it again fairly soon.

BuccioniPL

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2014, 07:22:19 PM »
Is there a way to quantify the difference between, say, 3 sets of 5 reps at a given intensity vs. 5x3? 3x5 will obviously feel harder, but is there a significant difference in training effect?

3 sets of 5 reps will take longer to recover from and not just between sets but also between workouts. If you want to quantify it you could look at the lactate build up inside the muscles. You get a linear increase in lactate with each rep. But if you were to look at ammonia build up you get a curvilinear response. If you stay below half the number of a certain rep max, i.e. 3 reps at 8RM, then there is no significant increase in ammonia. That means you can come back and do it again fairly soon.

Quite interesting comment! I did not know this different relation ammonia - reps, lactate -reps
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Sheiko37

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2014, 06:11:25 AM »
I want to understand this better, I feel like average intensity would be the result of well organised training and not the goal. If for example the first day of #37 (over 80kg) squat average intensity is 65%, alternatively I could do the format below.

%RM      Reps      Sets
90      1      5
60      10    3

The average intensity is about the same but clearly it's a different workout and poorly structured.

You could do however many sets and reps you like in the 80-90% range which would blow out your average intensity, but then you could just include a low of intensity sets to offset that and bring the average back to 69.5-72%, surely more is considered when creating the set and rep scheme for a workout.

Robert Frederick

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2014, 10:57:40 AM »
I want to understand this better, I feel like average intensity would be the result of well organised training and not the goal. If for example the first day of #37 (over 80kg) squat average intensity is 65%, alternatively I could do the format below.

%RM      Reps      Sets
90      1      5
60      10    3

The average intensity is about the same but clearly it's a different workout and poorly structured.

You could do however many sets and reps you like in the 80-90% range which would blow out your average intensity, but then you could just include a low of intensity sets to offset that and bring the average back to 69.5-72%, surely more is considered when creating the set and rep scheme for a workout.

It is the result and not the goal.

TheDane

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Re: General Training Overview - Intensity
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2014, 12:40:29 PM »
The concept of relative intensity and the multible ways the program it makes perfectly good sense. However, how should one program the top intensity from day to day and week to week, relative to NL?

To me, it would make sense to program the higher intensities in weeks containing the lower NL and the lower intensities at weeks containing higher NL. What is coach Sheiko's recommendation?