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Author Topic: Official Sheiko Beginner Program (Coach Assisted)  (Read 58232 times)

Robert Frederick

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Official Sheiko Beginner Program (Coach Assisted)
« on: April 08, 2014, 10:30:13 AM »
The following is the method Boris uses to get his absolute beginner students started off right. It is the product of decades worth of refinement. Of primary importance are technique development and increases of general athletic ability and work capacity. Although this program comes from a powerlifting specialist, due to its general nature it's really applicable to anyone starting off in the weight room. Systematically building the body and using objective measures of progress is just a recipe for success. 

One thing you'll notice is that sets are never take to failure.

Let's hear Pavel Tsatsouline explain it:

"

Once you appreciate that strength training - as opposed to bodybuilding is a form of skill practice, designing an effective customized strength program becomes just a matter of following the fundamental principles of motor learning. There are three. 



First, practice must be specific. Do not rep out with a light weight when you are training for a heavy single. 



The second rule is an extension of the first one. Practice fresh and stop before your skill starts deteriorating. That means ending your practice before you start dragging your tail - and saying no to training to failure. 



Third, practice as frequently as possible while observing the first two rules. 

Does it make sense for a tennis player to go to the court once a week and smash balls until his arm falls off? No, you go the court daily, ideally more than once a day, and serve until you begin to lose it. 

Why not do the same for you iron game? 



These principles exactly explain why SHEIKO is so effective. A lot of high level Russian lifters will train as many as 10 times a week, splitting workouts between squat/bench, and bench/deadlift. I've seen Andrey Belyaev's training programs, and they're nuts, and he never goes over 85%, generally he stays in the 80% range. 

These principles are much, much more important than diet, supplements, steroids or whatever."

Here Boris explains his philosophy on training beginners:

"When training novices the group method is used. The group method of training is a very practical way of studying exercise technique. All students in the group repeat the shown exercise one after another. When the trainer identifies an error in the execution of the exercise, the other trainees present try not to repeat this error. Thus they facilitate the process of instruction and accelerate the formation of habits.

For the training of novices it is necessary to use variations of the classical exercises that are similar in coordination requirements but considerably simpler. For example, sometimes when teaching the squat and the student is instructed in the proper back position, the student fails to attain proper depth.  In such cases it is useful to employ the box squat adjusted to the proper height. The student simply squats down to the box while holding the proper back position and immediately recovers. Thus proper depth is achieved.

In the case of learning to arch the lower back for the bench press the student lays on top of a foam roll. Gradually, over the course of a month the student becomes accustomed to assuming the necessary body position.  The same concerns the deadlift. According to our observations it is easier to learn the correct mechanics if the deadlift begins from blocks so that the bar is just above the knees. Over the course of several weeks the blocks are lowered until the initial barbell position begins off of the floor.  In combination with kettle ball squats, which force the student to maintain a straight back, the fulfillment of learning the deadlift is attained considerably more rapidly.

Thus novices master one method of fulfilling the exercise then another.

Another concern in training novices is they frequently overestimate their possibilities, with a strong sense of rivalry present between them. In each training session they try to lift maximum weights which can lead to injury and poor technique development. One very important way of mitigating these issues is to group the novices so that they are all of very similar ability. This way they do not attempt to replicate what another student has done  which may be beyond their current ability.

The trainee must remember that during the study of classical exercise technique, the principle value is not the weight of the bar, but rather the number of repetitions. When learning technique it is not possible to allow large stresses. Learning technique is best done with moderate weights.  Then the weight on the bar increases proportionally to mastery of the exercise and improvement of the general physical state of the student.  Both strong and weak stimuli are not optimal for the formation of conditioned reflexes. Only moderate stresses can ensure the successful acquisition of effective movement patterns of the classical exercises and contribute best towards physical development, which are necessary for lifting maximum weights.

In the end of the month we carry out competitions among the novices to determine the best classical exercise technique, not the amount of weight lifted. These competitions help the trainer to reveal the effectiveness of instruction as revealed by the errors of execution of exercise technique. This makes it possible to introduce corrections in the instruction procedure and to additionally include exercises which influence the correction of errors.

Thus, the primary objective for the novices is to obtain proper classical exercise technique and also the improvement of the physical condition.

The volume of load is expressed as the number of lifts (N.L.). We consider that this is sufficient at this stage. In connection with the fact that it is very difficult to determine the true limit of the novice these plans are written in kilograms from the minimum weight which is taken to be X. The initial weight X should be a weight that could be done for 10 moderately easy reps.  Weight for additional exercises should be such that 3-4 additional reps could be performed at the completion of the set."

Just a quite note on that: Since the development of a novice is quite rapid, the weight X suitable for one workout may no longer be suitable in the following workouts. In practice this means warming up to a set of 10 moderately easy reps and whatever weight that may be for the day, let it be X then take it from there. The same goes for a set labeled only 6 reps x 4 sets. These are considered additional exercises and so here you'd warm up to a set of 6 (which could be taken 3-4 reps further) then use the same weight for an additional 3 sets of 6.

Boris continues:

"The first two weeks it is desirable to include only one of the classical exercises. The remaining exercises can be developmental derivatives of the classical exercises or for the development of general physical ability. In the initial stages, the importance of general physical training supersedes that of special exercise preparation. In time, further increases in work on the classical exercises then occurs.

Also it is desirable to focus attention on the detriments of dieting in young athletes. Any reduction in weight is negatively reflected in the health of the athlete, retards his/her general physical development and inhibits an increase in sport results. Therefore, the artificial reduction in weight of adolescents and youth, whose physical development is not yet completed, and which can lead to the disturbance of endocrine function and cardiovascular activity, is not advised."

With that, let's see the program.


Approximate group program for novices.


* learning grip means – learning kinds of grip and how to put fingers around the barbell and the allowed length between hands

Month1

Week 1
Day 1
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Learning grip in squat
3. Learning bar position on back in squat.
4. Shoulder press standing with dumbbells  (left and right arm moves simultaneously) 6reps x 4 sets
5. Jumps to length (from standing in place) 10 reps
Day 2
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Getting better (consolidate skills) with bar position on back in squat.
3. Learning walk out of the rack and putting the barbell on the back 3reps x 4sets
4. Side lateral raises standing with dumbbells  6 reps x 4 sets
5. Running 30 meters x 5 sets
Day 3
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Getting better (consolidate skills) in walk out of the rack and putting the barbell back 3reps x 4sets
3. Learning squat technique on to box  (box squat) 5reps x 5sets
4. Learning grip in bench press
5. Db press on the bench 6 reps x 4 sets
6. Jumps over box  5 reps x 4 sets

Recommendations on schedule: Mon-Wed-Fri or Tues-Thurs-Sat

Week 2
Day 1
1.  Warm-up, 15 minutes
2.  Getting better (consolidate skills) in box squat 5 reps x 5 sets
3.  Learning technique of bench press with middle grip  4 reps x 5 sets
4.  Flies on the bench with dumbbells 6 reps x 4 sets
5.  Side lateral raises standing with dumbbells 6 reps x 4 sets
6.  Jumps to length (from place) 10 reps
Day 2
1.  Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Getting better (consolidate skills) in bench press with middle grip   4 reps x 5 sets
3. Seated rowing 6 reps x 5 sets
4. Biceps with db alternating & standing (6+6) reps x 5 sets
5. Football (soccer) 30 minutes
Day 3
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Learning grip in deadlift 2 reps x 3 sets
3. Learning start position in deadlift 3 reps x 4 sets
4. Db press on the bench 6 reps x 4 sets
5. Jumps to box 4 reps x 4 sets

Week 3
Day 1
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Box squat (height of the box – a bit higher than knees) Xkg -5 reps x 1 set, X+5 kg – 5 reps x 4 sets
3. Shoulder press standing with db (alternately)  (5+5) x 4 sets
4.  Flies on the bench with dumbbells 8reps x 4 sets
5. Triple jump to length from place (with no running) 3reps x 5 sets
Day 2
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Getting better (consolidate skills) in bench press with middle grip X kg – 5 reps x 1 set, X+5kg 5reps x 4 sets
3. Pull-ups  6 reps x 4 sets
4.  Front raises with db (standing  or seated) 8 reps x 4 sets
5. Abs (lying on inclined bench)  8reps x 3 sets
Day  3
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2. Getting better (consolidate skills) in getting start position in deadlift 3reps x 4 sets
3.  Learning deadlift off boxes deadlift (start position – bar is at 5-7 cm above the knees)  Xkg – 5 reps x 2 sets, X+5kg 4 reps x 3 sets
4. Pull downs 6 reps x 4 sets
5. Shoulder press standing with db (alternately)  (5+5) x 4 sets
6. Football (soccer)

Week 4
Day 1
1. Warm-up, 15 minutes
2.  Box squat (height of box is level of knees) X – 4 reps x 1 set, X+5 kg 4 reps x 1 set, X+10 kg 5 reps x 4 sets
3.  Db press on bench 6 reps x 5 sets
4. Flies on the bench with dumbbells, 8 reps x 4 sets
5. Side lateral raises standing 6 reps x 4 sets
Day 2
1. Warm up 15 minutes.
2. Bench press with middle grip X-5 reps x 1 set,  X+5 kg 4 reps x 1 set, X+10 kg 3 reps x 4 sets
3. Seated rowing 6 reps x 4 sets
4. French press 8 reps x 4 sets
5. Abs (raising of legs when hanging) 6 reps x 4 sets
Day 3
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Deadlift off boxes (start position at 5-7 cm above the knees) X – 4 reps x 1 set, X+5 4 reps x 1 set, X+10 kg 3 reps x 4 sets,
3. Shoulder press inclined (bench at 45 degrees), X kg– 3 reps x 2 set, X+5 kg 3 reps x 3 sets
4. Front raises with db standing 6 reps x 4 sets
5.  Goodmornings seated 4 reps x 4 sets
6. Running 30 meters x 5 reps


Month 2

Week 1
Day 1
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Box squat (knee level) X – 4 reps x 1 set, X+5 4 reps x 1 set, X+10 kg 5 reps x 4 sets
3. Db press 6 reps x 5 sets
4. Pull downs 6 reps x 4 sets
5. Abs (raisin legs when hanging) 8 reps x 4 sets
6. Jumps on box 5 reps x 4 sets
Day 2
1. Warm-up  15 minutes
2. Bench press with middle grip  X -5 reps x 1 set, X+5 reps x 4 sets
3. Flies with dumbbells 8 reps x 4 sets
4. Biceps with db standing (alternated) (5+5) x 4 sets
5. Goodmornings seated 4 reps x 4 sets
Day 3
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Deadlift off boxes (start position, bar is 5 cm below the knees) X – 4 reps x 1 set, X+5 kg 4 reps x 1 set, X+10 kg 3 reps x 4 sets
3. Shoulders press with db seated (alternated) (6+6) reps x 4 sets
4. French press lying 6 reps x 4 sets
5. Lateral side arms raises standing 6reps x 4 sets

Week 2
Day 1
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Squat Xkg  5reps x 1 set, X+5 kg 5reps x 1set, X+10 kg 4reps x 4sets
3. Shoulders press off the chest seated 4reps x 5sets
4. Biceps curls seated 6reps x 4sets
5. Pull downs (behind the neck ) 6reps x 5sets
6. Jump to distance (without running, from place) 10 reps
Day 2
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Bench press with middle grip Xkg 4 reps x 1 set, X+5 kg 4reps x1set, X+10 kg 3reps x 4sets
3. Db flies flat bench, 8reps x 4 sets
4. Biceps curls with db standing simultaneously 8reps x 4 sets
5. Front raises with db standing 6reps x 5sets
6. Goodmorning 5reps x 4sets
Day 3
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Deadlift off boxes (bar is at 5cm below knees) X+5kg 4 reps x 1set, X+10 kg 4reps x 1set, X+15kg 4 reps x 4sets
3. Shoulders press inclined (45 degrees) 3reps x 5sets
4. Seated rowing 6reps x 5sets
5. French press lying 6reps x 4sets
6. Abs (legs raises, lying) 8 reps x 4sets

Week 3
Day  1
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2.  Squat X+5 kg, 4reps x 1set,  X+10 kg 4reps x 1set, X+15 kg 3reps x 4sets
3.  Db press, 6reps x 5sets
4. Lateral side raises standing 6reps x 4sets
5.  Biceps curls standing (alternated) (6+6)reps x 4sets
6. Jump on to box 5reps x 5sets
Day 2
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Bench press with competition grip, Xkg 4 reps x 1set, X+5kg 3 reps x 1set,  X+10 kg 3reps x 4sets,
3. Db flies 8reps x 4sets
4. French press 8reps x 4sets
5. Hanging straight legs raises 8reps x 4sets
Day 3.
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Deadlift up to knees  X kg 3reps x 1set, X+5kg 3 reps x 4sets
3. Shoulders press inclined (45 degrees) 3reps x 5sets
4. Seated rowing  6reps x 5sets
5. Biceps curls with db simultaneously standing 8reps x 5set
6. Football 30 minutes

Week 4
Day 1
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2.  Squat X+5 kg, 6reps x 1set,  X+10 kg 4reps x 4sets
3. Shoulders press with dumbbells (alternated) seated (5+5)reps x 5sets
4. Front raises with db standing 6reps x 4sets
5. Lying leg raises 8reps x 4sets
6. Triple jumps for distance (without running, from place) 3reps x 5sets
Day 2
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Bench press with competition grip, X+5kg  4 reps x 1set, X+10kg 4 reps x 4sets
3. Db flies 8reps x 4sets
4.  Biceps with db standing (alternated) (6+6)reps x 5sets
5. Goodmorning 5reps x 5sets
Day 3
1. Warm-up 15 minutes
2. Deadlift Xkg 4reps x 1set, X+5kg 4 reps x 1 set, X+10 kg 4 reps x 4 sets
3. Shoulders press inclined (45 degrees) 3 reps x 5sets
4. Seated rowing 6reps x 5sets
5. Football 30 minutes
« Last Edit: June 03, 2014, 02:25:56 PM by Robert Frederick »

Mathies

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Re: Official Sheiko Beginner Program (Coach Assisted)
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2014, 05:47:23 PM »
What would Sheiko advice a young lifter to do after this program?

Also;
Triple jumps
Jumps to length (from standing in place)

Mind explaining these?:)

Robert Frederick

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Re: Official Sheiko Beginner Program (Coach Assisted)
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2014, 06:24:26 PM »
After this program move on to the stage 2 beginner program.

Jumps to length: From a standing position jump as far forward as possible.

Triple jumps: From a standing position jump as far forward as possible. Immediately upon landing, rebound out of the jump into another one. Repeat a third time.

« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 05:58:18 PM by Robert Frederick »

Mathies

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Re: Official Sheiko Beginner Program (Coach Assisted)
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2014, 09:33:22 PM »
Thank you very much :)

hurril

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Re: Official Sheiko Beginner Program (Coach Assisted)
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2014, 02:06:40 PM »
The program contains a comparatively small amount of chest training and plenty for the shoulders. I can think of a lot of reasons but I would still like to hear the reasoning behind this choice. (And, well, just more thoughts on why this looks the way it does.)