October 19, 2019, 04:45:15 PM

Author Topic: What would you say are the underlying principles behind Sheiko-style programming  (Read 6939 times)

Pimptasty

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I know Sheiko works. I've successfully used it for years, and have even trained more advanced clients using Sheiko cookie-cutter templates, like 29, 37, 30, 32, etc. (I believe they're former students' customized routines, correct?) posted online.

However, I've tried to find a general pattern with Sheiko and why certain set/rep schemes are used on certain days/weeks.

What would you say are the general ideas behind Sheiko?

Is it simply waving volume with a general, slow upward trend? Basically, prep, accumulation, transmutation, realization, repeat?

Robert Frederick

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What would you say are the general ideas behind Sheiko?

Is it simply waving volume with a general, slow upward trend? Basically, prep, accumulation, transmutation, realization, repeat?

Pretty much. Large loads are the best but they can't be used exclusively. So you also use medium loads for maintenance and small loads for recovery along the way.

Pimptasty

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What are your thoughts on rest time after a cycle? I was thinking of something like 29, 37, 30, 32, rest a few days, mock meet, rest a few days, REPEAT. Does this seem like a logical order for someone, so long as they don't yet fit into the advanced total classes?

Also, what are your thoughts on how gradually volume should be upped? Can't be anything too crazy, like an extra 3 top sets after every 4 mesocycles, but maybe something as gradual as one top set per 12 mesocycles (one top set added to each main movement each workout per year)? Though, that may also change the relative intensity too much. What's a good rule of thumb for this?

Also, after the initial preparatory phase and the 3 mesocycles and mock meet, would you once again go back to the prep phase to recover and have a more long-term, SUSTAINABLE program?

Robert Frederick

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You can rest up to two weeks. Do some active recovery that isn't too stressful. 29, 37, 30, and 32 is okay. You can even drop 29 and do 37, 30, 32.

If you do 1,000 lifts per month and you find you need more volume try 20% more -- 1,200 lifts. You can add that volume in by increasing the number of top sets here and there as well repeating some of the higher end warmup sets. Another option is to add reps to the days were you do volumetric workouts with lower intensity i.e. bench pyramids or squat ladders.

After your mock meet and recovery you start the training cycle all over again with any adjustments you feel are needed. That's pretty much it.

Pimptasty

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You can rest up to two weeks. Do some active recovery that isn't too stressful. 29, 37, 30, and 32 is okay. You can even drop 29 and do 37, 30, 32.

If you do 1,000 lifts per month and you find you need more volume try 20% more -- 1,200 lifts. You can add that volume in by increasing the number of top sets here and there as well repeating some of the higher end warmup sets. Another option is to add reps to the days were you do volumetric workouts with lower intensity i.e. bench pyramids or squat ladders.

After your mock meet and recovery you start the training cycle all over again with any adjustments you feel are needed. That's pretty much it.

I know I'm asking a lot here, but I'm just trying to ensure I'm on the right track. How would you slowly get a complete beginner into an all-out Sheiko-style program? Or, maybe I'm crazy, but due to their ability to adapt quickly, do you believe a complete beginner, WITH PROPER GUIDANCE, and of course underestimating maxes more than usual, could jump straight into a Sheiko-style prep program?

I'd guess that hammering down your technique from so much practice early on would provide beginners with a serious advantage.

Robert Frederick

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Have you seen the beginner program here on the forum? Basically they start out with lots of GPP stuff. Sheiko then introduces a single competitive lift against the backdrop of that GPP. They typically won't just jump right into the full lift either, but will build up to it by mastering individual elements of the lift before putting it all together. The beginner also won't have stable maxes yet either so there is no assigned weight. They come in, work up until the weight starts to affect the bar speed noticeably, then they do their work sets. Once their weights stabilize and they have acquired decent technique start the loading process with maybe 400 competitive lifts per month. Over time that number goes up and additional exercise volume goes down.

Bench Polkov

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Have you seen the beginner program here on the forum? Basically they start out with lots of GPP stuff. Sheiko then introduces a single competitive lift against the backdrop of that GPP. They typically won't just jump right into the full lift either, but will build up to it by mastering individual elements of the lift before putting it all together. The beginner also won't have stable maxes yet either so there is no assigned weight. They come in, work up until the weight starts to affect the bar speed noticeably, then they do their work sets. Once their weights stabilize and they have acquired decent technique start the loading process with maybe 400 competitive lifts per month. Over time that number goes up and additional exercise volume goes down.

I actually have my own ideas for a beginner program that will work ok without coaching. Boris's  seems very coaching centric. I'll have to get it on paper oneday.

Robert Frederick

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Yeah, do it. It's interesting thinking about how to give beginners a really solid start.

Pimptasty

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Yeah, do it. It's interesting thinking about how to give beginners a really solid start.
Yeah, I really want to focus on how to train beginners properly. I can train intermediate lifters, but beginners are often harder, of course.

How does Boris usually adjust when a student is either sick or misses a day?

Additionally, how much volume is too much? When you're a beginner with poor work capacity, you can simply improve it and gradually increase the volume (I've yet to figure out how quickly, however). For an athlete that already has a developed work capacity, for example, do you switch to manipulating intensity rather than volume, or should the increase in volume simply be greatly slowed down?

Bench Polkov

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Yeah, do it. It's interesting thinking about how to give beginners a really solid start.

How does Boris usually adjust when a student is either sick or misses a day?


A day or two would not make much difference I don't believe, but if it is a longer illness Robert answers that question here. If you miss lots of days or constantly do not complete your training for whatever reason, Boris gets cranky with you...


Quote
Additionally, how much volume is too much? When you're a beginner with poor work capacity, you can simply improve it and gradually increase the volume (I've yet to figure out how quickly, however). For an athlete that already has a developed work capacity, for example, do you switch to manipulating intensity rather than volume, or should the increase in volume simply be greatly slowed down?


I think Boris answers that question here...

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It is impossible to increase volume constantly with no limit. It means we have to increase something else, and that’s usually the intensity. Up to a point, you can get away with increasing both volume and intensity. For example, a beginner may perform 500 competitive lifts and special preparatory exercises in one month at 50-60% average intensity. Later on, that same athlete as a more advanced lifter could average 1,000 competitive lifts and special preparatory exercises at 67-69%. However, both volume and intensity cannot rise together indefinitely. At some point, you have to raise one and lower the other.

Many coaches in powerlifting try to create a foundation with the help of large volumes. They plan 5-12 lifts per set. With so many lifts, the intensity would not be more than 70-75%. If one also factors in warm-up weights between 50-60%, that means overall intensity per week or month will be no more than 63-65%. As a result, the body adapts to low-intensity work, which has a different nature than competition requirements. Despite a foundation built upon large volumes, the desired effect is not achieved.

It was shown a long time ago that competition results increase with increases of intensity. Results are maximized in those cases when you have an optimal ratio between competition and special exercise lifts and when you have a certain number of lifts of medium, large, submaximal, and maximal weights. Likewise, there is an optimal balance between volume and intensity. A. Vorobiev (1989) showed that a large load is the most efficient means to enhance the athletic performance of athletes. Furthermore, large loads only give a positive effect in cases when they alternate with small and medium loads, i.e. when a lifter has the conditions necessary for recovery after hard workouts. Medium load workouts are needed in order to maintain results at a certain level and low intensity workouts should be applied after hard and average ones. They help the body to recover, and it causes a sharp increase of operability.

The coach must take into account and keep in mind all the main factors and indicators of training: selection of exercises; volume; intensity; load variation; number of lifts of medium, large, submaximal, and maximal weights; mode of muscle activity, etc. On top of that, the needs of high-level athletes are very individual.


Hope this helps.

Pimptasty

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Yes, very much so. Thank you.