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Author Topic: Setting up a 1 Year Plan  (Read 1685 times)

joeyh

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Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« on: March 21, 2017, 05:24:26 AM »
Hi guys,

I am currently doing the U80kg Sheiko Plan. I am feeling fatigued from the volume but overall enjoy the style very much. I am big on long term planning and goals. I currently do not compete but have my goals for the next year developed as far as total.

I am wondering how I should approach planning out my training for a full year, I own the Sheiko app on android, and look forward to transitioning to that after the U80KG plan. I have no problems identifying weaknesses or increasing weights to improve my strength at this time.

I understand the the basic outline is prep 1, prep 2, Compete, but because I am not competing for at least the next year, how should I approach this? Also for the entire year should I be pressing for Large Load only, or should I stagger between large, medium, and small over the course of a year?

Looking forward to the discussion :)

« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 05:34:03 AM by joeyh »

joeyh

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Re: Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2017, 01:20:36 AM »
I was thinking something along the lines of 3 months of small load prep + accessory work/hypertrophy, followed by 3 months of Medium or Large load prep + less accessory and more SP.

Robert Frederick

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Re: Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2017, 09:05:03 AM »
I would do the program with the most volume that I can tolerate and do the comp cycles anyway, even if not competing. It's nice having those breaks.

bennyboi

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Re: Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2017, 11:55:20 PM »
I would do the program with the most volume that I can tolerate...

It's much easier to find this out with programs where you are pushing a 10RM with the weight of a 10RM. In Sheiko, however, a 10RM (~75%) is usually performed with sets of 3-4 reps.

How would you know what you can tolerate with Sheiko?

RussianBear

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Re: Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2017, 09:57:31 PM »
I would do the program with the most volume that I can tolerate...


It's much easier to find this out with programs where you are pushing a 10RM with the weight of a 10RM. In Sheiko, however, a 10RM (~75%) is usually performed with sets of 3-4 reps.

How would you know what you can tolerate with Sheiko?


First of all, 10 RM is not equal to volume tolerance. Second of all, in that case, you would experience technique breakdown - first rep would not look like last rep.

To the real question. http://sheiko-program.ru/forum/index.php?topic=311.0 gives a good insight in some numbers for average lifters. so one would start building from there.
"For one to press a lot, one must press a lot, comrade."

bennyboi

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Re: Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2017, 04:15:50 AM »
I would do the program with the most volume that I can tolerate...


It's much easier to find this out with programs where you are pushing a 10RM with the weight of a 10RM. In Sheiko, however, a 10RM (~75%) is usually performed with sets of 3-4 reps.

How would you know what you can tolerate with Sheiko?


First of all, 10 RM is not equal to volume tolerance. Second of all, in that case, you would experience technique breakdown - first rep would not look like last rep.

To the real question. http://sheiko-program.ru/forum/index.php?topic=311.0 gives a good insight in some numbers for average lifters. so one would start building from there.


Sorry, I should have been more clear. What I meant to say was that if one is pushing sets of 10 and increasing volume & intensity weekly, they will eventually not be able to match reps from last week. They will experience a loss in reps, and technical breakdown as well in the reps.

I guess technical breakdown is the only way to gauge fatigue. Thank you!