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Author Topic: The most frequent technique mistakes - Squat  (Read 8745 times)

RussianBear

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The most frequent technique mistakes - Squat
« on: September 19, 2016, 05:58:11 PM »
Boris have been touring the U.S. and from that there have come some interesting stuff out of.
During the tour Boris have visited gyms and during practice parts and training sessions he has defined the most common mistakes in competition exercises technique in the squat.

In the squat, the most common mistakes he saw athletes do:

1. High position of the bar on a back.
2. Extra steps before getting into starting position.
3. Excessive leaning over during squat.
4. Not breaking parallel.

1. High position of the bar on the back.

With high position of the bar it lies on trapezius muscles, as Olympic weightlifters do. With such position the angle between thighs and torso will be large. This will force knees to go forward and get steeper angle in the knee joint. Most work will go on quads and glutes.

Recommendation

Put the bar on rear deltoids, next to scapula. If with such bar positioning you experience discomfort in your elbows or shoulders then you should increase grip width to avoid it.

2. Extra steps before getting in starting position.

A lot of athletes make extra steps before getting into position to squat.

Recommendation

Do the bare minimum number of extra movements. Try to get into position with going 1-2 small steps, so you won’t waste energy. Sufficient distance is achieved once you don’t touch the squat rack during the exercise.

3. Excessive leaning over during squat.

When athlete has too much of incline in torso during squats on the way up – it means that his glutes and hamstrings are weak. To compensate that athlete puts extra load on quads and back muscles. Quads work the most in order to help hamstrings to overcome tension.

Recommendation

Include exercises for glutes and hamstrings in your training program.

1. For hamstrings: leg curls under different angles and lunges.
2. For glutes: Romanian deadlifts, single leg presses, hyperextensions, lunges and deep squats
3. Front squats.
4. Wall squats (can be advantageous to look here as well: http://sheiko-program.ru/wall-squats-help-to-fix-squat-technique)

4. Not breaking parallel.

Athletes, who start squats with knees bending, usually have a problem of knees traveling past the toes line. This makes it harder to reach the depth.

Recommendation

Start squat exercise with your hips going behind, and knees going the same direction as toes are pointing.

For quickest learning how to squat below parallel you should perform:

1. Squats with 2 sec pause in the hole.
2. Low box squats.

Here some pictures of good squatting technique.
They compete in the equipped category but you can still get the idea. Pay attention to their shins. They are vertical.The knees don’t go ahead at all. That is perfect technique!


Good Squatting Technique


Good Squatting Technique

 
« Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 06:19:47 PM by RussianBear »
"For one to press a lot, one must press a lot, comrade."

thenextblaha

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Re: The most frequent technique mistakes - Squat
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2016, 05:06:39 PM »

3. Excessive leaning over during squat.

When athlete has too much of incline in torso during squats on the way up – it means that his glutes and hamstrings are weak. To compensate that athlete puts extra load on quads and back muscles. Quads work the most in order to help hamstrings to overcome tension.

Recommendation

Include exercises for glutes and hamstrings in your training program.

1. For hamstrings: leg curls under different angles and lunges.
2. For glutes: Romanian deadlifts, single leg presses, hyperextensions, lunges and deep squats
3. Front squats.
4. Wall squats (can be advantageous to look here as well: http://sheiko-program.ru/wall-squats-help-to-fix-squat-technique)




So this is saying that out of the hole your hips come up more quickly than your torso and you end up pitching forward/squat looking like a goodmorning? I always thought that this shifted the load onto the posterior chain more as mainly the quads are too weak to take the load. So doing RDLs etc seems like the opposite thing to do (making the imbalance worse) although front squats are listed which seems to make more sense? Sorry just a little confused about this :)

RussianBear

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Re: The most frequent technique mistakes - Squat
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2016, 02:38:04 PM »

3. Excessive leaning over during squat.

When athlete has too much of incline in torso during squats on the way up – it means that his glutes and hamstrings are weak. To compensate that athlete puts extra load on quads and back muscles. Quads work the most in order to help hamstrings to overcome tension.

Recommendation

Include exercises for glutes and hamstrings in your training program.

1. For hamstrings: leg curls under different angles and lunges.
2. For glutes: Romanian deadlifts, single leg presses, hyperextensions, lunges and deep squats
3. Front squats.
4. Wall squats (can be advantageous to look here as well: http://sheiko-program.ru/wall-squats-help-to-fix-squat-technique)




So this is saying that out of the hole your hips come up more quickly than your torso and you end up pitching forward/squat looking like a goodmorning? I always thought that this shifted the load onto the posterior chain more as mainly the quads are too weak to take the load. So doing RDLs etc seems like the opposite thing to do (making the imbalance worse) although front squats are listed which seems to make more sense? Sorry just a little confused about this :)


If that is the case, in general it is because the legs are weak and the back are strong - it makes it look like a goodmorning. Front squats/split squats makes more sense for those lifters. I often also see that it is a problem of mobility in the hams/hips (for instance tight hamstrings).

I think Boris' point is that if that is the case (Excessive leaning), legs are usually weak and can be fixed by the prescribed exercises and doing warm-up with wall-squats.
"For one to press a lot, one must press a lot, comrade."

thenextblaha

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Re: The most frequent technique mistakes - Squat
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2016, 02:01:00 AM »
If that is the case, in general it is because the legs are weak and the back are strong - it makes it look like a goodmorning. Front squats/split squats makes more sense for those lifters. I often also see that it is a problem of mobility in the hams/hips (for instance tight hamstrings).

I think Boris' point is that if that is the case (Excessive leaning), legs are usually weak and can be fixed by the prescribed exercises and doing warm-up with wall-squats.

Okay that makes more sense thanks, if this is the case would it be wise to change some volume from deadlifts to squats/front squats/leg accessories? I believe usually it is 50/50 for squats and deads.