November 18, 2019, 11:47:15 AM

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Messages - bennyboi

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1
Makes sense.

The weights are feeling really good. I'd say my technique is solid on about 70% of my lifts.

Any recommendations on how long to wait?

Maybe wait until technique hits 95%+ for a period of 2 weeks?

2
I've heard Boris quoted saying how weights should feel like you have 1-2 reps in reserve (RIR) at all times.

If my RIR feel like 3-4+ for an extended period of time... should I bump my training maxes a bit?

Someone, on a different forum, quoted Boris saying how he recommends adding 5kg to 7.5kg... or... adding 1-2 reps per set if weights feel "too easy" for a prolonged period of time.

I decided to come here and find out for myself.

Thoughts?

3
Fascinating stuff, Robert!

It would be interesting to see how you could apply these principles to a simplified routine. Something that wouldn't require a meticulous approach to programming (less time spent on Excel sheets etc. haha).

Think of it like, the Pareto Principle of training (80:20 rule).

But that question alone, only brings up more questions.

If you were to take a modest, long-term approach to training... how would you progress? How would you program such progression?

I guess the only way you'd know is by trial and error...

Thank you for the back-and-forth conversation. The methodology behind your style of training is fascinating.

I'm looking forward to seeing your "work in progress" once it's completed.

4
So why does 3 reps over and over @8RM work? It's not maximal effort but certainly not low effort either. It's also not optimal for strength nor hypertrophy, at least in the short term, but probably a pragmatic compromise between the two that also has recovery and longevity advantages, which may become more important factors over the longer term.

Are you suggesting that this amount of effort (3r@80%) is superior in the long run, even though it may fail to deliver short-term gains?

Going back to your article... have you ever found an "optimal" INOL/lift for each intensity?

I've seen calculations done on several forums (regarding Sheiko cycles) where the "sweet spot" seems to be 0.15 INOL/lift. This was probably coincidental, but interesting nonetheless.

Here's what that "sweet spot" looks like:

8 reps @50%
7 reps @55%
6 reps @60%
5 reps @65%
5 reps @70%
4 reps @75%
3 reps @80%
2 reps @85%
2 reps @90%
1 reps @95%

Very similar to Sheiko. Almost identical, in fact, for intensities 60% and above.

5
Sounds like you want to read about my Exertion Load metric

http://www.strongur.io/monitoring-training-stress-with-exertion-load/

In most of the studies I've read, researchers know that effort is a major variable and so they control for that by taking all sets to failure.


Haha, it is your article that brought me here (great article btw).

I guess I'm getting intrigued because of your rep quality comment from here: http://sheiko-program.ru/forum/index.php?topic=6.msg1597#msg1597

"If you stay below half the number of a certain rep max, i.e. 3 reps at 8RM, then there is no significant increase in ammonia. That means you can come back and do it again fairly soon."

On an RPE scale, 8 reps @8RM = RPE 10.

But 3 reps @8RM = RPE 5, or 5 RIR (however you wanna look at it).

Yet nobody programs RPE @5 in training (except for maybe Dietmar).

It would be interesting to see what has the most impact on training. Volume... intensity... effort... or something completely different?

Until a study comes out that looks like this ... we won't get an answer:

  • Group A: 8rx3s @70% - 8rx3s @85% over a period of X-weeks.
  • Group B: 3rx8s @70% - 3rx8s @85% over a period of X-weeks.
  • Group C: 2rx12s @70% - 2rx12s @85% over a period of X-weeks.

Rest times: 3-5min

6
I couldn't find a study that only tested one variable at a time.

Every study I found put a ceiling on rest time between sets.

My question is: does "effort per set" matter when volume is equated?

For example, would there be a difference in strength and hypertrophy if two athletes had the following workout (rest times 3-5 minutes):

% x REPS x SETS
70 x 10 x 3

Vs.

% x REPS x SETS
70 x 3 x 10

Same number of lifts. Same volume. Different effort (and technical proficiency/rep quality).

How about this third example:

% x REPS x SETS
70 x 1 x 10
70 x 2 x 10

Does it make a difference?

Some more theoretical examples below:

% x REPS x SETS
50 x 6 x 1
60 x 4 x 1
70 x 4 x 4
80 x 2 x 4
34 lifts @67.6%

% x REPS x SETS
50 x 3 x 2
60 x 2 x 2
70 x 2 x 8
80 x 1 x 8
34 lifts @67.6%

Another example...

% x REPS x SETS
50 x 6 x 1
60 x 4 x 1
70 x 4 x 1
70 x 8 x 1
70 x 6 x 1
70 x 8 x 1
70 x 4 x 1
65 x 6 x 1
55 x 8 x 1
54 lifts @64.3%

% x REPS x SETS
50 x 6 x 1
60 x 4 x 1
70 x 4 x 3
70 x 3 x 2
70 x 2 x 6
65 x 3 x 2
55 x 4 x 2
54 lifts @64.3%

I guess what I'm trying to ask is: Can "effort per set" be "too low" to make strength/hypertrophy adaptations?

All of these workouts look identical on paper, but they would all feel different for trainees.

7
Universal Topics / How many of you write your own Sheiko program?
« on: July 13, 2017, 03:54:43 PM »
Most people use the app or the spreadsheets, from what I gather. Do any of you write your own Sheiko programs entirely?

Do you use an excel sheet to crunch the numbers?
Do you plan out an entire mesocycle or do you plan it week by week?

Basically what I'm asking is, do any of you do for yourself what Boris Sheiko does for his clients?

8
Universal Topics / Re: RPE sets on Sheiko
« on: June 27, 2017, 03:49:14 PM »
So it seems at most you'd go to RPE9 but most sets between 6-8RPE?

Interesting to see how that compares to other programs which have you often going near RPE9. I suppose they can do that without going too heavy via higher rep sets whilst sheiko doesn't really have that.

If you look at the original RTS manual, the old RPEs have an @8 = 2-4 reps. And if you look at Mike's recommendations for 'volume' phases, triples and doubles are done at an RPE of @8-9. You would reach 1 RIR with either repeats or load drops. Sheiko and RTS are pretty similar when RIR and reps are concerned. As a matter of fact, your Average Relative Intensity will fall in the same lines for ~70% if you stick to the principles. Both methods are excellent and both require a different kind of mental attitude.

9
Ahhh! Thank you! This makes a lot of sense. Clearly I misunderstood the terms.

Any word on the release date of Boris's book in english? I remember Mike Israetel was supposed to help translate it back in 2015...any updates?

10
Universal Topics / Re: Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« on: April 05, 2017, 04:15:50 AM »
I would do the program with the most volume that I can tolerate...


It's much easier to find this out with programs where you are pushing a 10RM with the weight of a 10RM. In Sheiko, however, a 10RM (~75%) is usually performed with sets of 3-4 reps.

How would you know what you can tolerate with Sheiko?


First of all, 10 RM is not equal to volume tolerance. Second of all, in that case, you would experience technique breakdown - first rep would not look like last rep.

To the real question. http://sheiko-program.ru/forum/index.php?topic=311.0 gives a good insight in some numbers for average lifters. so one would start building from there.


Sorry, I should have been more clear. What I meant to say was that if one is pushing sets of 10 and increasing volume & intensity weekly, they will eventually not be able to match reps from last week. They will experience a loss in reps, and technical breakdown as well in the reps.

I guess technical breakdown is the only way to gauge fatigue. Thank you!

11
Can you explain what Boris Sheiko meant when he posted the following,

Beginners Month 2-4 - The result is 450 - 550 competitive lifts and special preparatory exercises at low intensity in the range of 50-60%.

Classes 2 & 3 - Loading is increased from 600 - 750 competitive lifts and special preparatory exercises. The intensity of loads rises to 60-65% in the preparatory periods.

Class 1 and CMS - The number of lifts in competitive and special preparatory exercises for 16 workouts per month range from 800 - 1300. Intensity increases to 67-69% in the preparatory periods.

It kind of makes it seem that prep periods are of much lower intensity for most classes, since it is mentioned over and over again. Unless this was an error in translation.

It's from this link: http://sheiko-program.ru/forum/index.php?topic=311.0

But assuming prep cycles really are at 68-72% then what is the average relative intensity for peaking cycles?

12
Universal Topics / Re: Setting up a 1 Year Plan
« on: April 02, 2017, 11:55:20 PM »
I would do the program with the most volume that I can tolerate...

It's much easier to find this out with programs where you are pushing a 10RM with the weight of a 10RM. In Sheiko, however, a 10RM (~75%) is usually performed with sets of 3-4 reps.

How would you know what you can tolerate with Sheiko?

13
Quote
Classes 2 & 3 - 3 training sessions per week - The athletes continue pursing technique mastery. Special preparatory exercises are used not only to secure technique, but also to increase the strength qualities of lagging muscle groups. Loading is increased from 600 - 750 competitive lifts and special preparatory exercises. The intensity of loads rises to 60-65% in the preparatory periods. The share of general physical exercise is reduced slightly.


From here: http://sheiko-program.ru/forum/index.php?topic=311.0

If I am a Class III lifter, does this mean that if I were to program my own cycles, it is recommended to stay within 60-65% for the preparatory cycles? I'm assuming peaking is at 68-72%?

Week 1 - NL: 63 | aRI: 64.1 
Week 2 - NL: 44 | aRI: 65.4 
Week 3 - NL: 83 | aRI: 64.7
Week 4 - NL: 32 | aRI: 68.5
NL: 222 | aRI: 65.1

Or is the general recommendation for all classes to train between 68-72%?

14
Universal Topics / Sheiko Prep Blocks without the Comp blocks
« on: March 05, 2016, 05:49:56 AM »
What would be the general guidelines for someone interested in getting as strong as possible without necessarily testing maxes? Like taking Sheiko prep blocks without the comp blocks for a long time, 8-12+ months. Would such a program work outside of theory or are the testing blocks necessary to judge progress?

How would one go about picking the load for a specific rep without knowing their 1RM?

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