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Messages - BirkirkaraBarbell

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I had a competition late in September.  My results were 227.5/142.5/262.5kg at 95.5kg bodyweight.
I have just done the World Championships WDFPF in Moldova just 5 weeks later.
To prepare for this competition I did 37v2 and week 4 of 32.
My results were 232.5/145/272.5 at 95.4kg bodyweight
Personal bests were deadlift by 2.5kg (my previous best was 270) and my 650kg total for a 5kg PB ( previous best was 645).
I have used 3 day a week Sheiko training for three years.  I do not change anything from the programs unless injured.  I only add some additional work for my back (mostly rowing) and I do stretching and mobility exercises after my sessions.  This time the only thing I added is bench presses for singles at 90% because 37v2 was not meant as a peaking phase.  However it still worked well for squat and deadlift.
All lifts were done raw.


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Universal Topics / Re: Equipment Discussion Thread
« on: September 11, 2014, 11:37:57 PM »
I love my old Dual Quad Titan Suit.  It is not as stiff as the Super Cent so I can pull it up by myself even though it fits tight.  And gives me incredible spring.

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Universal Topics / Re: Suggestions for Equipment
« on: September 11, 2014, 11:31:40 PM »
Ok fine.  At least I have one answer as to why some people prefer the Metal King Sumo Deadlifter


[/quote]Only my opinion, but the Metal is stretchier so it is easier to get down in a tight suit.  For the Titan it is so stiff, getting down is much harder and then the suit must be looser so the pop is less.
[/quote]

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Universal Topics / Re: Guidelines on sumo
« on: September 10, 2014, 05:32:04 PM »
The formula provided above makes a lot of sense cause it is based on leverages.  Now we all know that most lifters who do well in certain lifts have advantageous levers for that particular lift, for example most great deadlifters have short torsos, long arms and long legs while most great bench presses have short arms, long torsos and wide shoulders.
However this formula fails to take into account other physiological features such as width of hip structure and thickness of back musculature. 
We all know that sumo deadlifts place more stress on the hip while conventional deadlifts place more stress on the back.  So more often than not, lifters with wide and robust hips can take more work in sumo style while thinner lifters with smaller hips might encounter hip pain/stress deadlifting sumo.  Likewise, lifters with thick strong back musculature might prefer deadlifting conventional while athletes with less back thickness compared to their hip structure might prefer saving their backs from extra stress by performing the lift sumo style and shifting the emphasis to their stronger hips.

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Universal Topics / Re: Suggestions for Equipment
« on: September 10, 2014, 05:08:24 PM »
Hi Buccioni,

Why is the Metal King your favourite deadlift suit for sumo?  Is there a scientific reason for this or is it just the feel?  A lot of lifters on forums say Metal Sumo Deadlifter is the best suit for sumo deadlifting but none of them give a concrete reason.  Sometimes I suspect they might be repeating each other.
I own a Metal King Sumo Deadlifter as well as a conventional Titan Velocity deadlift suit and half a dozen Titan squat suits.  Titan has a harness system which is very tough stitching around the hip area.  This harness system is what makes Titan's suits superior to other brands.  The harness stores more energy thus enabling you to lift more weight if your back is strong enough, and also it makes the suit last longer or stretch out less quickly.  The metal suit is much softer, so it does not store so much energy.  It is easier to use but gives me less aid.  Having said that, I do not own any other suit which is built for sumo.  And the squat suits I own are all Regular Stance Versions.
As to the Velocity it is literally a squat suit with a higher front panel.  So no need to invest in a deadlift suit if you got a squat suit.  Use the latter for both squat and deadlift.  Only reason I bought it was to try it out and since Titan suits last a decade I decided I might just as well invest in an extra suit.

To summarize everything, my question is why is Metal King superior to Titan Velocity, Inzer Fusion or other suits for sumo?

Thanks

Hi there,

my point is go for a centurion. TRX gives much less kg, although some guy prefers it. But as you can see watching around, the vast majority of the lifters use the centurion. It lasts a lot, at least one time it was lasting a lot...

For bench shirt. F6 it's a good option, but as soon as you're get used to it, go for a superkatana, more kg on the bar.

I agre for knee wraps, gold and metal silver are the best.

Deadlift: it depends much on how you pull. You can use the centurion RS for both sumo and regular deadlift, but you need a strict control of your technique.
My preferred sumo deadlift suit is by far the metal king.

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Tutorials / Re: Great Bench Press Biomechanics Tutorial by Connor Lutz
« on: September 01, 2014, 10:14:01 AM »
Tks for sharing.  Really informative.  Can anyone provide some pointers on benching with a single ply bench shirt?

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Biomechanics / Re: advantages of head lifting in benching
« on: September 01, 2014, 02:47:20 AM »
Lifting the head up at the bottom during the bench press is used by lifters using a multiply bench shirt in federations which allow this kind of technique. (IPF and other raw and single ply equipment Feds usually are stricter).
The technique is called Collapsing.
When a bencher pinches his shoulder blades and sets up with an arched position, he is stretching the chest plate of the shirt.  Once he starts lowering the bar,the shirt quickly loads to an extent that it is usually impossible to stretch the shirt further and touch the bar to the sternum while keeping archedosition and retracted shoulder blades.  (Provided the shirt is not oversized).  So at that point the lifter collapses momentarily by loosing his arch and flattening his chest, and in doing so he puts his head forward.  This releases tension in the shirt and gets the bar to touch.  On the press command the lifter pushes the bar upwards and quickly gets back into arched position again to lock the bar out with retracted shoulder blades firmly pinned against the bench.

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Thanks for your kind reply Robert
We previously were presented with a 29-30-31-32 model which some described as a Preparation (29), Accumulation (30), Transmutation (31), Realisation/Peaking (32) scenario.  In fact a number of lifters described 32 as too much of too little when performing it after 8 weeks of moderate training (eg. 29-37-32 or 37-37-32).  However it made sense to be performed at the end of 16 weeks of work, especially after the high volume/moderate intensity 30 and medium volume/medium to high intensity 31. 
However we are now presented with a model which suggests that 30 and 31 produce the same result and are solely interchangeable according to the bodyweight of the lifter and that the cycle should be 12 weeks long rather than 16.  Also the peaking cycle remains a four weeker, whether the whole cycle is 12 or 16 weeks long.
I understand that coaches learn and gain experience, and learn what works best overtime.  Less warm up sets is one of the changes from the original templates to the present day ones.
can anybody who is in touch with the man himself explain the concept behind these 12 and 16 week model changes?

Your source of info is suspect. 29, 30, 31, 32, and 37 come from a variety of different sources. They do not constitute a training program, as designed by Sheiko. 37 and 32 came from one book for example and were presented in that book as single examples of a prep and comp period, respectively. Boris intentionally presented only samples and not complete training programs because he didn't want the book to be too long. Somewhere else, someone has given these programs their own interpretation. That's not necessarily bad though. You are supposed to be making them work for you. For example, here you have 2 different programs for different people. Everyone has different needs.

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We previously were presented with a 29-30-31-32 model which some described as a Preparation (29), Accumulation (30), Transmutation (31), Realisation/Peaking (32) scenario.  In fact a number of lifters described 32 as too much of too little when performing it after 8 weeks of moderate training (eg. 29-37-32 or 37-37-32).  However it made sense to be performed at the end of 16 weeks of work, especially after the high volume/moderate intensity 30 and medium volume/medium to high intensity 31. 
However we are now presented with a model which suggests that 30 and 31 produce the same result and are solely interchangeable according to the bodyweight of the lifter and that the cycle should be 12 weeks long rather than 16.  Also the peaking cycle remains a four weeker, whether the whole cycle is 12 or 16 weeks long.
I understand that coaches learn and gain experience, and learn what works best overtime.  Less warm up sets is one of the changes from the original templates to the present day ones.
can anybody who is in touch with the man himself explain the concept behind these 12 and 16 week model changes?

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